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Cemex re-opens Czech concrete plant after modernisation

by Mark Cantrell
Cemex has launched a recycling plant for residual concrete at its newly re-opened facility in the Czech Republic.

Cemex has launched a recycling plant for residual concrete at its newly re-opened facility in the Czech Republic.

The original concrete plant, located in Prague-Libuš, had been in operation since the late 1990s. It was closed in 2018 to undergo necessary reconstruction.

Following a complete renovation, it has been adapted to the requirements of current modern construction technology, and re-opened last month.

According to Cemex, the site can now process five types of cements and admixtures, including the company’s more sustainable range of Vertua concretes, and it is also prepared for the use of recycled aggregates.

In line with Cemex’s climate action strategy, Future in Action, the site aims to support the circular economy as far as possible, with two recycling plants installed. These process the residual concrete, separating aggregates and sand that can then be reused.

In addition, the company says the concrete batching plant is equipped with the most advanced filters and, as part of the refurbishment, it has been clad with special sandwich panels to ensure quiet operation and environmental friendliness.

Ruediger Kuhn, Cemex’ vice president for materials in central Europe, said: “Our plant in Libuš forms an important part of our operation in the Czech republic, thanks to its interesting location in the wider centre of the capital, and in the immediate vicinity of the planned construction of the Prague Metro D line.

“We are therefore very pleased to have this site reopened following a considerable investment.

“The development at this site confirms Cemex’s determination to offer its customers superior quality products, while also meeting its sustainability objectives, supporting the circular economy and reducing emissions wherever possible.”


Read next: Squaring the circularity of sustainable construction

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